Thursday, July 17, 2014

Life Lessons





There are many things Justin and I hope to pass on to Reece, in fact we have a very clean vision of the young man that will stand before us in the years to come based on the things we hope to pass on, and the life lessons we hope to share with him. We know, of course, that our vision may not be the actual end result, but by holding that vision it helps guide us in these early years. It helps us decide pretty easily the things we do, the places we go, the people we connect and share our lives with, and the way we choose to live.

One of the very important lessons we hope to share with Reece is about where our food comes from. We, as you know, grow a lot of our own food, so Reece knows that food does come from the backyard. But we also get food from other places. We visit the farmer's market regularly, offering Reece the opportunity to meet and get to know the people who grow some of the food we eat, and we also head out often throughout the summer season to pick berries and apples. We head to the same farms each year, farms that choose not to use chemicals, we chat with the farmers, who we get to know a little more each summer, and we share time together, picking the food that we will eat over the next few days, and also process to enjoy throughout the winter.

Reece knows the food we grow in the backyard starts as a little seed; a little seed that we plant, nurture, harvest, and then eat. He has, over the last few years, gained a very real understanding of the work that is required to grow the food on our plates. He has a deeper connection to the food he eats, he asks where foods come from and who grew it when they are served, and he shares his gratitude before each meal as we join hands to share a blessing.

Food is an important part of our lives, and by sharing with Reece the process of growing, and picking our food, he develops a deeper connection to the food he eats, to the farmer who grows it and in the end, to the earth he lives on.

Definitely a wonderful lesson I am happy to be passing on.

22 comments:

  1. Kim I think that is one of the most important life lessons there is to pass on to our babies. You and Justin are raising Reece so much like Mike and I raised our family, it makes me smile.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Tracey. And knowing that we are leading a similar path as you and your family makes me smile. xo

      Delete
  2. I think it's brilliant that you have such a clean vision, and from what I see here it looks like Reece is growing up just as you'd like him to be so far.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, and so far, so good :)

      Delete
  3. Oh that's such a precious lesson...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is, and one I think is sometimes forgotten in our world today.

      Delete
  4. such a valuable lesson to teach... our world needs more teachers like you !!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. It is the same for us. Now that Little Miss is older, we have her participate in every part of what is produced in our backyard and take her to the market and farms. My daughter (and son later) will never answer the question "where does your food come from?" with "From the grocery store."... That to me is one of the most important lesson in life!

    xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think so too Yanic. Although, don't get me wrong, we still get some food from the grocery store, although the topic of conversation lately has been around how we can remedy that. We are working out a plan to maybe leave the grocery store behind completely. It won't be easy though.

      Delete
  6. Beautiful! :) You are doing a great job Kim!

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is what all children need. Grocery store culture is draining in every way. Give them sunshine, dirt and seeds any day!

    ReplyDelete
  8. yes! yes! yes! We are also trying to instill in Ellie these same values and knowledge. It already shows in the way she tries so much of the good food we give her (versus myself as a child who never tried anything but was also fed veggies straight from a can or fruit layered in sugary syrup). It's important life stuff and you and Justin are doing an excellent job!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't it wonderful when they will try new foods without hesitation. My favourite is watching Reece walk around the garden just picking food here and there to nibble one.

      Thank you Summer. xo

      Delete
  9. As you know we are imparting the same lessons on our girls! I love that they love the various farms and farmer's markets that we go to and that they love to be outside and growing things! To them this is totally normal (and I am sure that they think all kids have this as their normal too)! Such an amazing childhood these littles of ours have and such a great foundation we are all laying for when they are older! xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do know that Shel, and I have never thought about the fact that Reece thinks this is completely normal, and for some it just isn't. xo

      Delete
  10. It is a magical gift to be able to bestow on a child, the knowledge and skill to grow sustenance for life. It is something that will set them apart in years to come.
    Also those berries - Oh my they look so delicious :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I sure hope so Aimee :) Aren't they awesome, and to think the farmer told us the picking wasn't that good this year. He was so wrong.

      Delete
  11. he is learning loads and loads, I grew up with a dad who did organic gardening when we moved to the 'burbs on a 1/4 acre. I thought all dads did that, and all dads loved new foods to eat and new recipes. So I'm sure Reece will enter the world thinking all parents know where their food is from and nurture it from seeds when possible! Lovely post :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Karen. I love that you have those memories and carry them with you, it makes me hopeful Reece will remember too.

      Delete